ACM Programming devotes to competitive programming. In such environments you are given a limited amount of time to create solutions to problems that are correct and efficient. Their correctness and efficiency are usually automatically tested. Apart from having fun, being a part of this project helps students to think about their product before coding it, and to be able to create something that is always correct, on all corner cases. There are several programming competitions per year, like the Google Code Jam, the Facebook Hacker Cup, the Topcoder Open and the ACM ICPC (sponsored by IBM). While we do focus on all of them, the ACM ICPC receives special attention.
From 1998 to 2016, Cornell has advanced to the World Finals 12 times (out of 19 times of participation), 8 times winning the regional contest and 4 times of runner-up (second place).More recently, we went to Thailand as one of the 128 world finalist among tens of thousands of teams.

Faculty Advisors:
Walker White, CIS

Student Leaders
Victor Reis, vor3@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


Enigneers Without Border's mission is to implement sustainable engineering projects in developing communities around the world. We promote responsible engineering practices and establish strong, long-lasting connections with the communities we partner with. Through these partnerships, our team has the opportunity to learn many important skills, such as teamwork, management of resources and finances, and international cultures, to turn our ideas into reality. On campus, our team works year-round to address the many different aspects of a successful engineering project, including project design and evaluation, fundraising and publicity, travel logistics, community education, and team development.

Our team is currently working with the community of Calcha, Bolivia on a water storage system and a bridge. Students have traveled to Calcha every summer since 2014 for project assessment and implementation. This year, we are preparing for water system implementation and evaluation of our recently constructed bridge in the summer of 2017. We also hope to begin working with a second community in the near future.

Faculty Advisors:
Peter Hess, BEE

Student Leader
Susan McGrattan, sjm353@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


Engineers for a Sustainable World (ESW) strives to increase awareness of sustainability issues and to integrate sustainable engineering systems into the global and local communities. We envision a world of environmental, social, and economic prosperity created and sustained by local and global collective action. We have four main project teams: Human Powered Electricity Generator, Solar Ovens, Solar Kiosk, and Biofuels. Each team requires members to research, design, and implement a sustainable engineering system using a different from of alternative energy.

Faculty Advisors:
Francis Vanek, CEE
Ruth Richardson, CEE (sabbatical year)
Student Leader
Emma Burke, edb76@cornell.edu

For more info, please visit our team website!


The Cornell University Genetically Engineered Machines (CU GEM) team is an international award-winning biology-inspired project team based in Cornell University. Our group is completely student run and is comprised of undergraduate students drawn from various disciplines and levels of expertise across the university. The team’s mission is to design and develop a novel genetically modified platform, using the principles of synthetic biology, to compete at the world’s premier synthetic biology competition – international Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM). Our vision is to create synthetic biology tools and processes that will offer breakthrough answers to the many needs of industry and the economy.

Faculty Advisors:
Jan Lammerding, BME

Student Leader
Saie Ganoo, smg322@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


The AguaClara program develops innovative methods to make safe drinking water accessible to resource poor communities. Since 2005 the AguaClara team has created a systematic approach to identifying problems, conducting research, creating design algorithms, and working with implementation partners to take designs to full scale. Feedback from operators of the full scale plants and from local engineers inform the research objectives of the team, creating an innovation cycle that empowers student team members to investigate topics with a direct connection to impact in the field.

AguaClara has successfully constructed twelve working water treatment plants serving over 50,000 people in Honduras. The team also has a presence in India and has also won numerous phase I and II EPA P3 grants, as well as other NSF grants.

Faculty Advisors:
Monroe Weber-Shirk, CEE

Student Leaders
Serena Takada, st587@cornell.edu
Subhani Katugampala, sfk48@cornell.edu
Zoe Maisel, zam7@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


Engineering World Health (EWH) is a multi-disciplinary team of Mechanical, Electrical, Biological, Chemical, and Computer engineers with the goal of designing novel technical solutions for improving health care in developing countries. EWH participates in the annual EWH Design Competition each June against chapters around the world. The EWH Design Competition tests students’ innovative capabilities in identifying a health care problem in developing countries and developing a viable technical solution. Moving forward, EWH is looking to collaborate with health and nonprofit organizations to create solutions that directly address real-world medical problems and can be implemented immediately. The technologies developed thus far have the potential to truly make an impact.

This year will be our fourth year as a registered project team. Two years ago, we placed third with our passively cooling vaccine refrigeration device in the international EWH Design competition (our first submission).Last year, we worked on 3 separate projects with a team of about 25 students. We completed a prototype for an baby holster made with antimicrobial fabric as well as a low-cost and networked vital signs monitor. We were partially through the prototype of an autologous blood transfusion device before the year ended. Also, our team funded 5 members to go on a week-long trip to Peru as part of a crowdfunding campaign. This allowed for our members to receive in-the-field experience while working with doctors in mobile clinics in Lima, and return with real-world project ideas for our next design cycles.

Faculty Advisors:
David Erickson, MAE

Student Leaders
Justin Selig, jss459@cornell.edu
Kate Schole, kls289@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!