The Cornell University Autonomous Bicycle Project Team is a multi-disciplinary team of mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, and computer science students working together to build a robotic bicycle with the ability to balance itself the same way a person balances on a bicycle: using steering manipulation. We hope to set a world record for maintaining stability while motionless (track-stand) for the longest time. Not only is our bicycle highly stable at low speeds but it can also easily recover from external forces. Through the use of GPS and image processing, we aim for the bike to be navigationally autonomous and travel unassisted around Cornell campus. In short, we are working to create the world’s best autonomous bicycle by achieving these goals: track-standing, autonomous navigation, and low-speed stability despite disturbances.
As a part of the mechanical team, students have the chance to learn about bicycles and how they work. They will also get hands-on experience with building and designing the various mechanical aspects of this robot. Those interested in bicycle dynamics and/or control theory may also generate simulations of the bicycle and develop different algorithms to help us better control this robot.
We use a number of sensors and an Arduino Due microprocessor on our robot, so students on our electrical team have a chance to delve into both hardware and software. The CU Autonomous Bicycle project team allows its members the opportunity to expand upon what they have learned in the classroom and from more experienced students, and apply it in a hands-on laboratory setting.

Faculty Advisors:
Andy Ruina, MAE

Student Leaders
Kyle Fenske, kaf222@cornell.edu
Arundathi Sharma, ams692@cornell.edu
William Murphy, wsm64@cornell.edu
Olav Imsdahl, oai2@cornell.edu


The CU Solar Boat team is Cornell’s youngest project team on campus. This year, the team will design a full size, single occupant, fully functioning speed boat to compete in the Intercollegiate Solar Splash Competition. The competition is a five-day event with a qualifying round, and the three main races. The first event is the solar slalom race, which involves driving the boat in closed X/8- shape course. To be successful in this race, the boat must be responsive and have easy maneuverability, especially turning at high speeds. The second event is 300-meter sprint. The boat be designed with minimal drag to ensure that it will reach the necessary high speeds to outperform other models. The third race is a two-hour long endurance event. In order to excel in this event, the boat must have the perfect balance of power conversion, efficiency and speed.The entire CUSB team is comprised of dedicated and hardworking students devoted to helping the team succeed in our ultimate goal – excelling in the Solar Splash competition. The team is divided into three main teams: mechanical, electric, and business. The Mechanical team is in charge of boat design, fabrication [eg. composite work], drivetrain, and controls. The Electric team is in charge of designing and wiring the solar panels, developing the power system and cockpit interface. Finally, the Business team runs the financial and budgeting side of the operation. In doing so, the business team must raise money to ensure that the project is properly completed and is ready for the competition. CUSB provides all members who take initiative and demonstrate great work ethic the opportunity to be involved throughout the project.

Faculty Advisors:
Max Zhang, MAE

Student Leader
Chaim Futran, ccf59@cornell.edu
Liam Strejcek, lcs223@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


Cornell Baja SAE is a student run, student operated project team that designs, builds, and races a one seat off-road vehicle. Every year the team goes through and designs every part on the car from scratch, developing engineering skills in the form of CAD, finite element analysis, and design-to-manufacture thinking, in addition to theoretical and conceptual knowledge learned in the classroom. Cornell Baja SAE takes the engineering skills learned in class one step further, creating an environment where students can learn, real, applicable, hands on design practices that will be invaluable when they go into the industry.
Baja SAE Tennessee Tech 2016: 2nd Overall, 2nd Design, 1st Suspension and Traction
Baja SAE California 2016: 2nd Overall, 2nd Design, 2nd Overall Dynamic Events, 1st Suspension and Traction
Baja SAE Rochester 2016: 4th Overall, 2nd Endurance, 3rd Overall Dynamic Events, 1st Suspension and Traction

Faculty Advisors:
Olivier Desjardins, MAE

Student Leader
Jay Fetter, jdf258@cornell.edu
Jordan Wakser, jdw279@cornell.edu
Deepthi Krovvidi, dk562@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


We are a team of students from Cornell University aiming to accelerate the development of Hyperloop by designing and building a pod to compete in the annual SpaceX Hyperloop competition. Our previous experiences working in other Hyperloop teams and the combined talents of our diverse team allow us to succeed in revolutionizing efficient transportation.

Faculty Advisors:
Michel Louge, MAE

Student Leader
Alana Marzoev, mam655@cornell.edu
Alexandra Voinea, av348@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


The Cornell Concrete Canoe team constructs a canoe made of concrete and competes in the annual Upstate NY Regional ASCE Conference each spring. Through designing the canoe’s structure and composition, team members learn creative engineering, problem solving skills, and collaborative teamwork.
Our team is comprised of six subteams: Mix Design, Mold, Logistics, Analysis, Aesthetics, and Paddling. The Mix subteam designs the composition of the concrete for the canoe, which must be light yet strong. Analysis models the canoe using MATLAB and finite element analysis software in order to determine the stresses on the canoe hull under different loading situations, while the Mold subteam uses this information to design the hull shape and construct a mold for the concrete. In addition, the Aesthetics subteam develops a theme for the project and incorporates it into the design of the canoe and the overall competition display. Throughout the year, the Paddling subteam practices proper paddling technique in order to be competitive in races, and the Logistics subteam manages the budget and team schedule in order to ensure we accomplish all goals.
This past year, the Concrete Canoe was able to construct a 19.5-foot canoe weighing only 180 lbs, and the team placed third in competition.

Faculty Advisors:
Ken Hover, CEE

Student Leaders
Carolyn Schwartz, cas485@cornell.edu
Daniella Blyakhman, db627@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


Our team will design, build, and compete with an all-electric motorcycle. To accomplish this task, we will learn about power electronics, bicycle vehicle dynamics, sustainable transportation, and systems engineering in addition to many other topics. This team aims to provide a hands-on design experience similar to that of many other MAE project teams while catering to the interests of electrical engineers. The ECE department does not currently have classes that focus on high power electric motors, batteries and battery chemistry, or control theory. By working to create this motorcycle, we will learn to independently research and solve problems to supplement the core curriculum provided to us by the electrical and mechanical engineering departments.

Faculty Advisors:
Michael Spencer, ECE

Student Leader
David Moy, dtm88@cornell.edu

For more info, please visit our team website!


Founded in 1986, Cornell Racing designs, builds and tests a new Formula-style racecar to compete in the Formula SAE series every year. Our team is composed of 60 undergraduate and graduate students divided into 14 technical and non-technical subteams. The majority of our team members are technical subteam leads and members who are responsible for the design of each component on the car. These members learn the analysis and manufacturing techniques needed to complete their component while being restricted by time and budget. Overall team leads must become fluent in all systems on the car and use their technical expertise to guide subteam leads and general members while coordinating the completion and testing of the car. A group of non-technical members also manage university, sponsor, and relations with the public as well as team marketing and finance. This structure gives the team the feeling of working for a company rather than a student organization.Formula SAE is an incredible experience in that it challenges students to take on a massive project which can be developed over a period of years. The depth of this project cannot be offered in a typical one semester class.

Formula Michigan 2015 – 6th in acceleration, 7th place in marketing
Formula Michigan 2014 – 8th in design, 11th in skidpad
Formula Michigan 2013 – 6th overall, 1st in acceleration
1st overall – 1998, 1992, 1993, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005


Faculty Advisors:
Al George, MAE
John Callister, MAE

Student Leaders
Larry Lenkin, lsl83@cornell.edu
Kern Sharma, ks869@cornell.edu
Lucas Sganderlla, ls674@cornell.edu
Jonathan de la Fuente, jmd454@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!