The Cornell University Autonomous Bicycle Project Team is a multi-disciplinary team of mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, and computer science students working together to build a robotic bicycle with the ability to balance itself the same way a person balances on a bicycle: using steering manipulation. We hope to set a world record for maintaining stability while motionless (track-stand) for the longest time. Not only is our bicycle highly stable at low speeds but it can also easily recover from external forces. Through the use of GPS and image processing, we aim for the bike to be navigationally autonomous and travel unassisted around Cornell campus. In short, we are working to create the world’s best autonomous bicycle by achieving these goals: track-standing, autonomous navigation, and low-speed stability despite disturbances.
As a part of the mechanical team, students have the chance to learn about bicycles and how they work. They will also get hands-on experience with building and designing the various mechanical aspects of this robot. Those interested in bicycle dynamics and/or control theory may also generate simulations of the bicycle and develop different algorithms to help us better control this robot.
We use a number of sensors and an Arduino Due microprocessor on our robot, so students on our electrical team have a chance to delve into both hardware and software. The CU Autonomous Bicycle project team allows its members the opportunity to expand upon what they have learned in the classroom and from more experienced students, and apply it in a hands-on laboratory setting.

Faculty Advisors:
Andy Ruina, MAE

Student Leaders
Kyle Fenske, kaf222@cornell.edu
Arundathi Sharma, ams692@cornell.edu
William Murphy, wsm64@cornell.edu
Olav Imsdahl, oai2@cornell.edu


CUAir, Cornell University Unmanned Air Systems, is an interdisciplinary project team working to design, build, and test an autonomous unmanned aircraft system capable of autonomous reconnaissance missions. This includes tasks such as autonomous take-off and landing, waypoint navigation, automatic in-flight obstacle avoidance, target detection, classification and localization, and payload delivery. The team combines aspects of computer science, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering and business and provides students with the opportunity to learn about unmanned air systems in a hands-on setting. Some of the team’s research topics include airframe design and manufacture, propulsion systems, wireless communication, image processing, target recognition, and autopilot control systems.
CUAir competes in the annual Student Unmanned Air Systems (SUAS) Competition sponsored by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) at the PAX River Naval Base in Maryland.

Faculty Advisors:
Thomas Avedisian, MAE
Rachit Agarwal, CIS
Bruce Land, ECE

Student Leader
Brendan Quinn, cuair_mae@cornell.edu

For more info, please visit our team website!


CUAUV is a project team composed of around 45 undergraduate students from freshman to seniors that competes in AUVSI’s international Robosub competition. Each year, we design, build, program, and test a completely new autonomous submarine; in August, we ship our sub down to San Diego, put it in a 200’x300′ Navy testing pool, press the green button, and cheer it on as it navigates a complicated underwater obstacle course with no human intervention whatsoever: ramming buoys, dropping markers on objects, firing torpedoes through particularly colored targets, re-positioning PVC structures, and more. CUAUV constructs our submarine from the ground up, fusing skills, tools, and curricula of relevance from mechanical, electrical, software, and organizational engineering. This year, were pursuing a long-held team-wide goal: the creation of two separate submarines which can work synergistically with each other during the competition in order to provide a new level of redundancy and in-water decisionmaking/optimization. In addition, were continuing the integration of a generic electrical communication protocol, refining our vectorized thrust concept from last year in order to adequately deal with measured torques, revamping several software subsystems, and redesigning our well-loved but slightly out-of-fashion website.

First Place Overall, AUVSI Robosub Competition: 2014, 2013, 2012, 2010, 2009, 2003
Second Place Overall, AUVSI Robosub Competition: 2011, 2004, 2002, 2000

Faculty Advisors:
Robert Shepherd, MAE
Bruce Land, ECE

Student Leader
Joseph Featherston, leader@cuauv.org

For more info, please visit our team website!


The Cornell Mars Rover team designs an innovative, robotic Mars rover that competes annually in the international University Rover Challenge. We are an interdisciplinary, student-run team that brings together talented minds from engineering, science, and business. There are members on our team from a number of Engineering majors, Computer Science, as well as Business and Finance majors. Our rover features a robotic arm for manipulating control panels, a robotic drill for taking and testing soil samples, and a combination rocker-independent suspension for traversing rough terrain. We are looking forward to our 6th year at competition, hosted by the Mars Society at the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah.

8th Place at URC in 2016

Faculty Advisors:
Carl Poitras, ECE

Student Leader
John Draikiwicz, jwd94@cornell.edu

For more info, please visit our team website!


The goal of CU Sail is to design and manufacture a small, inexpensive, and mass-producible autonomous robotic sailboat that can intelligently navigate any body of water and collect data. The project is meant to decrease environmental research and acoustic marine mammal monitoring costs by designing a research vessel that can cheaply collect data such as salinity, turbidity, fluorescence, or acoustic patterns. We use competitions as both objectives for our team to strive towards and a refinement process for our boat, learning from other teams and the performance of our own boat to improve our sailboat drone’s design, manufacturing, and performance. CU Sail provides its members with an outstanding opportunity for them to both apply their knowledge from classes and expand upon it in exciting ways.

Faculty Advisors:
Andy Ruina, MAE

Student Leader
Gabriel Zimmerman, giz4@cornell.edu

For more info, please visit our team website!


The CU Solar Boat team is Cornell’s youngest project team on campus. This year, the team will design a full size, single occupant, fully functioning speed boat to compete in the Intercollegiate Solar Splash Competition. The competition is a five-day event with a qualifying round, and the three main races. The first event is the solar slalom race, which involves driving the boat in closed X/8- shape course. To be successful in this race, the boat must be responsive and have easy maneuverability, especially turning at high speeds. The second event is 300-meter sprint. The boat be designed with minimal drag to ensure that it will reach the necessary high speeds to outperform other models. The third race is a two-hour long endurance event. In order to excel in this event, the boat must have the perfect balance of power conversion, efficiency and speed.The entire CUSB team is comprised of dedicated and hardworking students devoted to helping the team succeed in our ultimate goal – excelling in the Solar Splash competition. The team is divided into three main teams: mechanical, electric, and business. The Mechanical team is in charge of boat design, fabrication [eg. composite work], drivetrain, and controls. The Electric team is in charge of designing and wiring the solar panels, developing the power system and cockpit interface. Finally, the Business team runs the financial and budgeting side of the operation. In doing so, the business team must raise money to ensure that the project is properly completed and is ready for the competition. CUSB provides all members who take initiative and demonstrate great work ethic the opportunity to be involved throughout the project.

Faculty Advisors:
Max Zhang, MAE

Student Leader
Chaim Futran, ccf59@cornell.edu
Liam Strejcek, lcs223@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


Cornell Baja SAE is a student run, student operated project team that designs, builds, and races a one seat off-road vehicle. Every year the team goes through and designs every part on the car from scratch, developing engineering skills in the form of CAD, finite element analysis, and design-to-manufacture thinking, in addition to theoretical and conceptual knowledge learned in the classroom. Cornell Baja SAE takes the engineering skills learned in class one step further, creating an environment where students can learn, real, applicable, hands on design practices that will be invaluable when they go into the industry.
Baja SAE Tennessee Tech 2016: 2nd Overall, 2nd Design, 1st Suspension and Traction
Baja SAE California 2016: 2nd Overall, 2nd Design, 2nd Overall Dynamic Events, 1st Suspension and Traction
Baja SAE Rochester 2016: 4th Overall, 2nd Endurance, 3rd Overall Dynamic Events, 1st Suspension and Traction

Faculty Advisors:
Olivier Desjardins, MAE

Student Leader
Jay Fetter, jdf258@cornell.edu
Jordan Wakser, jdw279@cornell.edu
Deepthi Krovvidi, dk562@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


We are a team of students from Cornell University aiming to accelerate the development of Hyperloop by designing and building a pod to compete in the annual SpaceX Hyperloop competition. Our previous experiences working in other Hyperloop teams and the combined talents of our diverse team allow us to succeed in revolutionizing efficient transportation.

Faculty Advisors:
Michel Louge, MAE

Student Leader
Alana Marzoev, mam655@cornell.edu
Alexandra Voinea, av348@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


The Cornell Concrete Canoe team constructs a canoe made of concrete and competes in the annual Upstate NY Regional ASCE Conference each spring. Through designing the canoe’s structure and composition, team members learn creative engineering, problem solving skills, and collaborative teamwork.
Our team is comprised of six subteams: Mix Design, Mold, Logistics, Analysis, Aesthetics, and Paddling. The Mix subteam designs the composition of the concrete for the canoe, which must be light yet strong. Analysis models the canoe using MATLAB and finite element analysis software in order to determine the stresses on the canoe hull under different loading situations, while the Mold subteam uses this information to design the hull shape and construct a mold for the concrete. In addition, the Aesthetics subteam develops a theme for the project and incorporates it into the design of the canoe and the overall competition display. Throughout the year, the Paddling subteam practices proper paddling technique in order to be competitive in races, and the Logistics subteam manages the budget and team schedule in order to ensure we accomplish all goals.
This past year, the Concrete Canoe was able to construct a 19.5-foot canoe weighing only 180 lbs, and the team placed third in competition.

Faculty Advisors:
Ken Hover, CEE

Student Leaders
Carolyn Schwartz, cas485@cornell.edu
Daniella Blyakhman, db627@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


Our team will design, build, and compete with an all-electric motorcycle. To accomplish this task, we will learn about power electronics, bicycle vehicle dynamics, sustainable transportation, and systems engineering in addition to many other topics. This team aims to provide a hands-on design experience similar to that of many other MAE project teams while catering to the interests of electrical engineers. The ECE department does not currently have classes that focus on high power electric motors, batteries and battery chemistry, or control theory. By working to create this motorcycle, we will learn to independently research and solve problems to supplement the core curriculum provided to us by the electrical and mechanical engineering departments.

Faculty Advisors:
Michael Spencer, ECE

Student Leader
David Moy, dtm88@cornell.edu

For more info, please visit our team website!


Founded in 1986, Cornell Racing designs, builds and tests a new Formula-style racecar to compete in the Formula SAE series every year. Our team is composed of 60 undergraduate and graduate students divided into 14 technical and non-technical subteams. The majority of our team members are technical subteam leads and members who are responsible for the design of each component on the car. These members learn the analysis and manufacturing techniques needed to complete their component while being restricted by time and budget. Overall team leads must become fluent in all systems on the car and use their technical expertise to guide subteam leads and general members while coordinating the completion and testing of the car. A group of non-technical members also manage university, sponsor, and relations with the public as well as team marketing and finance. This structure gives the team the feeling of working for a company rather than a student organization.Formula SAE is an incredible experience in that it challenges students to take on a massive project which can be developed over a period of years. The depth of this project cannot be offered in a typical one semester class.

Formula Michigan 2015 – 6th in acceleration, 7th place in marketing
Formula Michigan 2014 – 8th in design, 11th in skidpad
Formula Michigan 2013 – 6th overall, 1st in acceleration
1st overall – 1998, 1992, 1993, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005


Faculty Advisors:
Al George, MAE
John Callister, MAE

Student Leaders
Larry Lenkin, lsl83@cornell.edu
Kern Sharma, ks869@cornell.edu
Lucas Sganderlla, ls674@cornell.edu
Jonathan de la Fuente, jmd454@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


Engineering World Health (EWH) is a multi-disciplinary team of Mechanical, Electrical, Biological, Chemical, and Computer engineers with the goal of designing novel technical solutions for improving health care in developing countries. EWH participates in the annual EWH Design Competition each June against chapters around the world. The EWH Design Competition tests students’ innovative capabilities in identifying a health care problem in developing countries and developing a viable technical solution. Moving forward, EWH is looking to collaborate with health and nonprofit organizations to create solutions that directly address real-world medical problems and can be implemented immediately. The technologies developed thus far have the potential to truly make an impact.

This year will be our fourth year as a registered project team. Two years ago, we placed third with our passively cooling vaccine refrigeration device in the international EWH Design competition (our first submission).Last year, we worked on 3 separate projects with a team of about 25 students. We completed a prototype for an baby holster made with antimicrobial fabric as well as a low-cost and networked vital signs monitor. We were partially through the prototype of an autologous blood transfusion device before the year ended. Also, our team funded 5 members to go on a week-long trip to Peru as part of a crowdfunding campaign. This allowed for our members to receive in-the-field experience while working with doctors in mobile clinics in Lima, and return with real-world project ideas for our next design cycles.

Faculty Advisors:
David Erickson, MAE

Student Leaders
Justin Selig, jss459@cornell.edu
Kate Schole, kls289@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


ACM Programming devotes to competitive programming. In such environments you are given a limited amount of time to create solutions to problems that are correct and efficient. Their correctness and efficiency are usually automatically tested. Apart from having fun, being a part of this project helps students to think about their product before coding it, and to be able to create something that is always correct, on all corner cases. There are several programming competitions per year, like the Google Code Jam, the Facebook Hacker Cup, the Topcoder Open and the ACM ICPC (sponsored by IBM). While we do focus on all of them, the ACM ICPC receives special attention.
From 1998 to 2016, Cornell has advanced to the World Finals 12 times (out of 19 times of participation), 8 times winning the regional contest and 4 times of runner-up (second place).More recently, we went to Thailand as one of the 128 world finalist among tens of thousands of teams.

Faculty Advisors:
Walker White, CIS

Student Leaders
Victor Reis, vor3@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


Cornell App Development is an engineering project team and student organization focused on iOS app development and education. Every semester, we choose an idea for a new app and take that idea from conception to completion, culminating with a release on Apple’s App Store. Our core team is made up of experienced designers and developers who collaborate to turn ideas into finished products.In addition to the project process, the team will also offer an education series for interested, but inexperienced developers. Students can apply to the training program with minimal experience in computer science, and if accepted, will join the team as a Developer in Training. Through this program, trainees will learn the basics of iOS app development and learn the skills required to apply as a Junior Developer on the core team in the following semester. We also wish to host a Fall and Spring Hackathon this year.

Faculty Advisors:
Walker White, CIS

Student Leader
Annie Cheng, ac962@cornell.edu
Dennis Fedorko, df338@cornell.edu
Adam Elshaer, ae277@cornell.edu
Andrew Aquino, aja255@cornell.edu
Ilan Filonenko, if56@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


Cornell Data Science has three central goals: educate students about the world of data science, implement machine learning and statistical algorithms in student-run projects, and connect students to both other students and professionals in industry and academia who use data science. Our new intro data science course aims to teach beginners with little programming experience and get them analyzing datasets. More experienced members join our semester-based projects, which have included tracking misinformation in social networks, creating an exhibit with Cornell University Sustainable Design that analyzed the effectiveness of different sustainable practices, and developing a betting strategy for Formula One races (a virtual $50 investment would have yielded $800 by the end of the semester using our strategy). We also offer opportunities for students to meet and learn from professors and data science professionals in industry through our talks and networking events.

Faculty Advisors:
David Mimno, CIS

Student Leader
Dae Won Kim, dk444@cornell.edu

For more info, please visit our team website!


The Cornell University Genetically Engineered Machines (CU GEM) team is an international award-winning biology-inspired project team based in Cornell University. Our group is completely student run and is comprised of undergraduate students drawn from various disciplines and levels of expertise across the university. The team’s mission is to design and develop a novel genetically modified platform, using the principles of synthetic biology, to compete at the world’s premier synthetic biology competition – international Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM). Our vision is to create synthetic biology tools and processes that will offer breakthrough answers to the many needs of industry and the economy.

Faculty Advisors:
Jan Lammerding, BME

Student Leader
Saie Ganoo, smg322@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


The AguaClara program develops innovative methods to make safe drinking water accessible to resource poor communities. Since 2005 the AguaClara team has created a systematic approach to identifying problems, conducting research, creating design algorithms, and working with implementation partners to take designs to full scale. Feedback from operators of the full scale plants and from local engineers inform the research objectives of the team, creating an innovation cycle that empowers student team members to investigate topics with a direct connection to impact in the field.

AguaClara has successfully constructed twelve working water treatment plants serving over 50,000 people in Honduras. The team also has a presence in India and has also won numerous phase I and II EPA P3 grants, as well as other NSF grants.

Faculty Advisors:
Monroe Weber-Shirk, CEE

Student Leaders
Serena Takada, st587@cornell.edu
Subhani Katugampala, sfk48@cornell.edu
Zoe Maisel, zam7@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


The Cornell Rocketry Team is an engineering project team dedicated to the design and building of high powered rockets. Each year, the team participates in the NASA Student Launch competition, which typically involves launching a high-powered rocket with a science payload to a certain altitude. The requirements for rockets and payloads change each year, which requires the team to be quite adaptable. As a result, the team focuses on building an extensive skill set in design, analysis, manufacturing, and testing of designs. The team continually grants motivated students the opportunity to work with others who share the same interests and gain hands-on experience with technical equipment involving 3D printing, molding carbon fibers, machining, and laser cutting.
Aside from preparing for the Student Launch, the team also places an emphasis on giving back to the community through STEM-related outreach events, volunteer opportunities, and service projects around Ithaca. Past outreach events have included family nights at the Ithaca Sciencenter and STEM tutoring in Ithaca.
Although CRT remains one of the youngest project teams, the passion and drive its members have for aerospace engineering and rocketry have led to its rising popularity on campus. The current team is composed of roughly 35 undergraduate students from across multiple schools and majors at Cornell University. The team is organized into many different subteams which change each year to best fit that year’s NASA Student Launch competition. As a whole, the subteams work together to grow in their shared interests and to develop better engineering, communication, leadership, and teamwork skills.

Faculty Advisors:
Daniel Selva, MAE

Student Leader
Rebecca Jiang, rhj47@cornell.edu
Danny Kumpf, dsk256@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


Cornell ChemE Car strives to teach newer members and learn as a team to be as successful as possible at the Regionals and Nationals competitions. We will never stop trying to improve our car, research better methods and beat the records we have set at competition. Our team wants to place first at nationals and regionals this year. In addition, we would love to continue helping enrich the community through outreach events like EYES, bring your child to work day, and Project Team Leadership roundtable discussion. We are also looking into the possiblity of hosting a regionals competition on campus and maybe even developing a more challenging ChemE Car competition.

Internationals:
6th: 2009

Nationals:
1st: 2008, 2010, 2012,2015


Faculty Advisors:
Roseanna Zia, CBE

Student Leader
Senior Captain – Charles Wan, ctw49@cornell.edu
Junior Captain – Jessie Reeves, jer335@cornell.edu
Business Officer – Ryan Wu, rw462@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


Enigneers Without Border's mission is to implement sustainable engineering projects in developing communities around the world. We promote responsible engineering practices and establish strong, long-lasting connections with the communities we partner with. Through these partnerships, our team has the opportunity to learn many important skills, such as teamwork, management of resources and finances, and international cultures, to turn our ideas into reality. On campus, our team works year-round to address the many different aspects of a successful engineering project, including project design and evaluation, fundraising and publicity, travel logistics, community education, and team development.

Our team is currently working with the community of Calcha, Bolivia on a water storage system and a bridge. Students have traveled to Calcha every summer since 2014 for project assessment and implementation. This year, we are preparing for water system implementation and evaluation of our recently constructed bridge in the summer of 2017. We also hope to begin working with a second community in the near future.

Faculty Advisors:
Peter Hess, BEE

Student Leader
Susan McGrattan, sjm353@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


Cornell Design Build Fly (DBF) is an engineering project team in which students develop, build and test a custom radio-controlled airplane design to compete in the AIAA Design Build Fly Competition. AIAA DBF is an annual international competition attracting over 80 undergraduate teams. Students utilize the design process, from conceptual design to fabrication, in order to best meet the requirements listed by competition officials. The DBF competition is unique in that the rules and requirements change drastically from year to year, thereby challenging participants to start fresh and come up with innovative designs every year.

2016- 8th place overall


Faculty Advisors:
Andy Ruina, MAE

Student Leaders
Eric Fiegel, edf52@cornell.edu
Martin Herrera, mh866@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


The Cornell University EERI Seismic Design Team designs, builds, and tests a scaled multi-story balsa wood tower for an international undergraduate competition hosted every spring at the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute’s (EERI) annual meeting. At competition, the tower is scored on a number of categories including architecture, model predictions, building revenue and costs, team presentations, and most importantly whether or not the structure survives all three ground motions. Our team offers a great opportunity for students interested in all engineering disciplines, especially those focused in construction, structures, architecture, seismology and more, to experience the process of bringing a project from an abstract thought to a tangible product. On our cohesive team, students have ample opportunities to experience hands-on construction, learn several different applicable softwares, use a laser cutter, acquire leadership positions, and above all, make a substantial impact on the final building!

The team was founded in 2013 by Victoria Rhodes ‘13 and has made great strides over the past few years improving its tower each year. We look forward to continuing improvements and successes! If you have any questions or would like more information, please email cornellseismicdesignteam@gmail.com. Thank you!


Faculty Advisors:
Mircea Grigoriu, CEE
Greg McLaskey, CEE

Student Leaders
Scott Kaufman, sk963@cornell.edu
Shannon Spiers, sss275@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


Engineers for a Sustainable World (ESW) strives to increase awareness of sustainability issues and to integrate sustainable engineering systems into the global and local communities. We envision a world of environmental, social, and economic prosperity created and sustained by local and global collective action. We have four main project teams: Human Powered Electricity Generator, Solar Ovens, Solar Kiosk, and Biofuels. Each team requires members to research, design, and implement a sustainable engineering system using a different from of alternative energy.

Faculty Advisors:
Francis Vanek, CEE
Ruth Richardson, CEE (sabbatical year)
Student Leader
Emma Burke, edb76@cornell.edu

For more info, please visit our team website!


Steel Bridge is an undergraduate project team under the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) that annually competes in the American Institute of Steel Construction Student (AISC) Steel Bridge Competition. Each year, students spend the year designing, analyzing, fabricating, and constructing a bridge. The Steel Bridge team aspires to foster leadership, problem-solving skills, and hands-on field experience. Team members are able to utilize their classroom knowledge to optimize a bridge with the lightest weight, fastest constructability, and lowest deflection. All members of the team are additionally encouraged to participate in the hands-on experience of bringing the bridge from theory to reality. The Cornell Steel Bridge allows all team members the opportunity to partake in the fabrication and construction process, in which students learn how to cut, drill, and weld members of the bridge together.

Faculty Advisors:
Ken Hover, CEE

Student Leader
Ken Shimizu, kds76@cornell.edu

For more info, please visit our team website!