Engineering World Health (EWH) is a multi-disciplinary team of Mechanical, Electrical, Biological, Chemical, and Computer engineers with the goal of designing novel technical solutions for improving health care in developing countries. EWH participates in the annual EWH Design Competition each June against chapters around the world. The EWH Design Competition tests students’ innovative capabilities in identifying a health care problem in developing countries and developing a viable technical solution. Moving forward, EWH is looking to collaborate with health and nonprofit organizations to create solutions that directly address real-world medical problems and can be implemented immediately. The technologies developed thus far have the potential to truly make an impact.

This year will be our fourth year as a registered project team. Two years ago, we placed third with our passively cooling vaccine refrigeration device in the international EWH Design competition (our first submission).Last year, we worked on 3 separate projects with a team of about 25 students. We completed a prototype for an baby holster made with antimicrobial fabric as well as a low-cost and networked vital signs monitor. We were partially through the prototype of an autologous blood transfusion device before the year ended. Also, our team funded 5 members to go on a week-long trip to Peru as part of a crowdfunding campaign. This allowed for our members to receive in-the-field experience while working with doctors in mobile clinics in Lima, and return with real-world project ideas for our next design cycles.

Faculty Advisors:
David Erickson, MAE

Student Leaders
Justin Selig, jss459@cornell.edu
Kate Schole, kls289@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


ACM Programming devotes to competitive programming. In such environments you are given a limited amount of time to create solutions to problems that are correct and efficient. Their correctness and efficiency are usually automatically tested. Apart from having fun, being a part of this project helps students to think about their product before coding it, and to be able to create something that is always correct, on all corner cases. There are several programming competitions per year, like the Google Code Jam, the Facebook Hacker Cup, the Topcoder Open and the ACM ICPC (sponsored by IBM). While we do focus on all of them, the ACM ICPC receives special attention.
From 1998 to 2016, Cornell has advanced to the World Finals 12 times (out of 19 times of participation), 8 times winning the regional contest and 4 times of runner-up (second place).More recently, we went to Thailand as one of the 128 world finalist among tens of thousands of teams.

Faculty Advisors:
Walker White, CIS

Student Leaders
Victor Reis, vor3@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


Cornell App Development is an engineering project team and student organization focused on iOS app development and education. Every semester, we choose an idea for a new app and take that idea from conception to completion, culminating with a release on Apple’s App Store. Our core team is made up of experienced designers and developers who collaborate to turn ideas into finished products.In addition to the project process, the team will also offer an education series for interested, but inexperienced developers. Students can apply to the training program with minimal experience in computer science, and if accepted, will join the team as a Developer in Training. Through this program, trainees will learn the basics of iOS app development and learn the skills required to apply as a Junior Developer on the core team in the following semester. We also wish to host a Fall and Spring Hackathon this year.

Faculty Advisors:
Walker White, CIS

Student Leader
Annie Cheng, ac962@cornell.edu
Dennis Fedorko, df338@cornell.edu
Adam Elshaer, ae277@cornell.edu
Andrew Aquino, aja255@cornell.edu
Ilan Filonenko, if56@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!


Cornell Data Science has three central goals: educate students about the world of data science, implement machine learning and statistical algorithms in student-run projects, and connect students to both other students and professionals in industry and academia who use data science. Our new intro data science course aims to teach beginners with little programming experience and get them analyzing datasets. More experienced members join our semester-based projects, which have included tracking misinformation in social networks, creating an exhibit with Cornell University Sustainable Design that analyzed the effectiveness of different sustainable practices, and developing a betting strategy for Formula One races (a virtual $50 investment would have yielded $800 by the end of the semester using our strategy). We also offer opportunities for students to meet and learn from professors and data science professionals in industry through our talks and networking events.

Faculty Advisors:
David Mimno, CIS

Student Leader
Dae Won Kim, dk444@cornell.edu

For more info, please visit our team website!


The Cornell University Genetically Engineered Machines (CU GEM) team is an international award-winning biology-inspired project team based in Cornell University. Our group is completely student run and is comprised of undergraduate students drawn from various disciplines and levels of expertise across the university. The team’s mission is to design and develop a novel genetically modified platform, using the principles of synthetic biology, to compete at the world’s premier synthetic biology competition – international Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM). Our vision is to create synthetic biology tools and processes that will offer breakthrough answers to the many needs of industry and the economy.

Faculty Advisors:
Jan Lammerding, BME

Student Leader
Saie Ganoo, smg322@cornell.edu


For more info, please visit our team website!